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The Great Western Leopard Toad

Western Leopard Toads live in the wetlands of the Bergvliet and Constantia Valley area suburbs. Their skins are highly sensitive to pollutants and they act as a warning system to the health of our local soil, water and wetlands. They are highly endangered and Die Oog is one of the main breeding sites in the Western Cape. During their breeding season, many are killed by passing cars when crossing roads but there is increased awareness in the media of this migration, which is encouraging for their future protection.

       

Click here for frequently asked questions about the Leopard toad.


Toad animations in 2008

If you would like to hear Leopard Toad's mating call (snoring), or see tadpoles swimming, or toadlets on the move, click below :


Toad's mating call "snoring" - top view                Toad's mating call "snoring" - front view

Tadpoles swimming at Die OOG                          Toadlets rescued from pool next to Die OOG

Toadlets traversing a lawn next to Die OOG          Toadlet leaving a bird bath next to Die OOG


The life cycle in 2008

              

          

                  

                   

Frequently asked questions about the Leopard toad

Q. I know that toads breed in a pond near where I live, should I call you?

A: Please wait until the toads start to call, then call the hotline.

Q: I've e found a live Western Leopard Toad on the road, what should I do with it?

A: Carefully take the toad out of the road and place it on the other side in the direction it was facing. Do not move the toad anywhere else. Do not move the toad to a wetland or pond. The toads can navigate and know where they are going. If you move them, they might get lost, or worse might end up in the wrong population.

Q: I've found a Western Leopard Toad in my garden, what should I do with it?

A: Much of the habitat for Western Leopard Toads is now gardens, so the toad is already where it should be. If you fear that the toad might fall into your swimming pool, or be attacked by your dog, then carefully move the toad within your garden but away from these risks. If you have a lot of toads in your garden, and a digital camera, you could help by taking ID pictures (see above). Do not move the toad anywhere else. Do not move the toad to a wetland or pond. The toads can navigate and know where they are going. If you move them, they might get lost, or worse might end up in the wrong population.

Q: My dog has attacked a Western Leopard Toad, will it harm my dog?

A: All toads have toxins which will be distasteful to dogs. The first taste that your dog gets should be so bad that it l ets the toad go. If your dog is persistent or if it is worrying the toad, then carefully move the toad to an area of your garden away from this risk. If you have a lot of toads in your garden, and a digital camera, you could help by taking ID pictures (see above). Do not move the toad anywhere else. Do not move the toad to a wetland or pond. The toads can navigate and know where they are going. If you move them, they might get lost, or worse might end up in the wrong population.

Q: I don't want Western Leopard Toads in my garden because they can kill my dog/s, what should I do?

A: Much of the habitat for Western Leopard Toads is now gardens, so the toad is already where it should be. If you fear that the toad might be attacked by your dog, then carefully move the toad within your garden but away from these risks. Toads are very useful in gardens as they eat many pests such as slugs. If you have a lot of toads then consider making an area of your garden which is off-limits to your dogs so that you can place the toads there. You can then put plastic sheeting along the bottom of the fence of this section, with openings to allow toads to freely access safer areas in and out of the cordoned section. If you have a lot of toads in your garden, and a digital camera, you could help by taking ID pictures (see above). Do not move the toad anywhere else. Do not move the toad to a wetland or pond. The toads can navigate and know where they are going. If you move them, they might get lost, or worse might end up in the wrong population.

Q: My dog has eaten a Western Leopard Toad, will my dog die?

A: All toads have toxins which will be distasteful to dogs. The first taste that your dog gets should be so bad that it lets the toad go. If your dog is persistent and eats the toad entirely you should contact your vet. If you have a lot of toads then consider making an area of your garden which is off-limits to your dogs so that you can place the toads there. You can then put plastic sheeting along the bottom of the fence of this section, with openings to allow toads to freely access safer areas in and out of the cordoned section.

Q: My cat killed a Western Leopard Toad, what should I do with it?

A: Place the toad in a plastic bag with a piece of paper stating the date you found it, the place you found it, your name and telephone number. Put the bag in your freezer and call the hotline.

Q: I found a dead Western Leopard Toad on the road, what should I do with it?

A: Place the toad in a plastic bag with a piece of paper stating the date you found it, the place you found it, your name and telephone number. Put the bag in your freezer and call the hotline.

Q: I found a dead Western Leopard Toad on the road but it is too squashed to pick up, what should I do with it?

A: Leave the body where it is. Look out for more toads in the same area.

Q: Toads keep falling into my swimming pool, what should I do?

A: Inspect your pool every morning and remove any toads as quickly as possible with a pool net. Rinse the toad with fresh water to remove harmful pool chemicals. Put the toads on the other side of your house away from the pool. This would be a good time to get an ID picture (see above). Place a piece of polystyrene or a plank of wood into your pool so that the toads have something to climb onto. This way, the toads won't be so harmed by them chemicals in your pool.

Q: A toad died in my swimming pool, what should I do with it?

A: Place the toad in a plastic bag with a piece of paper stating the date you found it, the place you found it, your name and telephone number. Put the bag in your freezer and call the hotline. To prevent more toads dying in your pool, place a piece of polystyrene or a plank of wood into the water so that the toads have something to climb onto.

The Leopard toad website
The Nature Conservation Corporation website
The Global amphibians website
The IUCN red list of threatened species